Tag Archives: thruster

Visualising Rosetta’s descent

Imagine how Rosetta’s descent might look if you were an observer at Comet 67P/C-G! This new animation visualises the final stages of Rosetta’s descent to Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko on 30 September 2016. The sequence is speeded up to show...

Rosetta and comet 67P/C-G to scale, assuming Rosetta is orbiting at a distance of 10 km, and the comet is about 4 km wide. Credits: ESA.

The third ‘fat’ burn

  We’re heading for the final 10,000 km between Rosetta and comet 67P/C-G today, with four of ten rendezvous burns left to complete before arriving on 6 August. Tomorrow’s burn is the third of four so-called ‘Far...

Half way through the burns!

Five down, five to go! We’re now half way through the rendezvous burn manoeuvres needed to put Rosetta on course with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and tomorrow will check off the sixth. Tomorrow’s burn is also the second of...

Rosetta smells its exhaust

Just in time to coincide with today’s orbit correction manoeuvre, we have a great blog update contributed by Kathrin Altwegg, from the ROSINA science team at the University of Bern. A spacecraft is made out of terrestrial...

Thrusters ON – update for 15:40 CEST

Photo taken about 55 mins ago in the Rosetta control room at ESOC as the temperatures of the four thrusters being used in today’s orbit correction manoeuvre started to rise, indicating the burn had started! Thruster temperatures...

The Big Burns Part 3

On Wednesday, 18 June, Rosetta will conduct the third in a series of three ‘Big Burns’, which are themselves part of the ten-burn series of orbit correction manoeuvres taking us to comet 67P/C-G.

The comet, which was discovered in 1969, has a diameter (nucleus) of four kilometres. Frame from 'Chasing A Comet – The Rosetta Mission' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5b7u6stKgfs Credit: DLR (CC-BY 3.0)

The Big Burns – Part 2

It's burn week in space again! Rosetta's next orbit correction manoeuvre – #BigBurn2 – is set for tomorrow, and is set to run for about 6hr:41mins and achieve a delta-v of 269.5 m/sec.

Rosetta Spacecraft Operations Manager Sylvain Lodiot monitoring the thruster burn on 21 May. Credit: ESA

Rosetta’s first Big Burn complete

The Rosetta team reports that last night's orbit correction manoeuvre (OCM) – or thruster burn – was completed as planned, providing the first of three big orbital 'pushes' to get the spacecraft lined up for comet arrival...

Rosetta in orbit. Credit: ESA/ATG medialab

The Big Burns – Part 1

Tomorrow, Rosetta will conduct a massive orbit correction manoeuvre (OCM) deep in our Solar System, switching on its thrusters for a bit less than 8 hours to reduce its speed relative to comet 67P by a whopping...