cleansat

Modelling a satellite’s fiery fall to Earth

Atmospheric re-entry of satellites is a destructive and difficult to predict process, as the satellite body breaks up into various segments which are scattered and subject to aerothermal heating. There are many uncertainties involved – not only...

Clean Space working with Earth Observation mission desi...

Sharing is caring: that goes for the space industry too – especially when it comes to tackling the common problem of orbit debris. Working on innovative solutions to make future satellites compliant with space debris mitigation, ESA’s...

video

Thomas Pesquet features in space debris video

On Friday 13 January 2017, Thomas Pesquet – the French astronaut currently flying over our heads in the International Space Station – performed a successful spacewalk. If you followed the resulting comments and questions on social media,...

audio

Podcast: Pollution spatiale sous haute surveillance

A month ago, Aurélie Luneau (of radio France Culture) in the environment programme, ‘De cause à effets, le magazine de l’environnement’, invited Christophe Bonnal, from France’s CNES space agency, Luisa Innocenti, from ESA, and Gérard Brachet, a...

Get your satellite to sleep safely II

From the beginning of the Space Age to our days, about 700000 objects larger than 1 cm have accumulated in orbit, counting both currently operational satellites and space debris. If you consider that the force of a...

Get your satellite to sleep safely

In the past, after the end of life, besides being left in orbit, spacecraft were also left with their batteries charged and connected, which poses a risk of battery breakup. This was one of the causes of...

What is a space debris?

This post has been written by Erwan Matton, stagiaire within the Clean Space team from 1st of May 2016 to 31st of August 2016.