Tag Archives: alert

Cryovex: Mowing the lawn in the Arctic

Today – Saturday 29 March had been seen as the most challenging day. We had prayed to the polar weather gods to bless us with good conditions for a survey of the sea ice in the region...

Over the Greenland ice cap to Alert

Malcolm (ESA), Alert, 2 April On Friday I was picked-up by the DTU team at Qaanaaq airport with their workhorse Twin Otter plane. It was a beautiful sunny day and we put it to good use. Instead of flying to Alert along the coasts of Greenland and Canada, we headed directly up onto the Greenland ice cap then turned north and flew along a CryoSat track acquired on the previous day. The transition from sea level to the ice cap itself is spectacular, often consisting of a succession of deeply crevassed glacier fronts. The ice cap itself is much less so, especially after a few hours of flying since, apart from some...

New CryoSat ice campaign kicks-off up north

From Malcolm (ESA), Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, 28 March After months of preparation and  hundreds or even maybe even a thousand emails, the 2012 CryoSat Validation Experiment otherwise known as ‘CryoVEx 2012’ finally kicks-off this week across the Arctic. Together with NASA colleagues and participating scientists from the USA, Canada and Europe, some remarkable airborne flights are planned later this week and early the week after. One of the highlights could come as early as tomorrow when the CryoSat satellite will pass over the Arctic Ocean from the north at about 7 km per second and pass almost directly over the Canadian military base Alert located at the northern tip of Ellesmere island. This...

Sea ice conditions around Alert

From Mark (ESA), in Noordwijk, NL Here are a couple of satellite images showing the current sea-ice conditions around Alert in northern Canada. The first is an AVHRR image from NOAA, courtesy of DMI/Polar View, and shows a large area perspective of the Lincoln Sea (upper part), Nares Strait (lower left) and Northern Greenland (lower centre). The marked box indicates the location where the following image focuses. A large-scale fracture pattern and relatively dark shear lines can be observed running through the sea-ice pack. They are caused by the sea-ice drift pushing ice against the coast of Northern Greenland. A relatively dark zone of divergence or opening occurs where ice escapes eastwards...