OSIRIS data release: close orbits and lander delivery

The Rosetta Downlink and Archive group are pleased to announce the release of over 4000 OSIRIS images to the Archive Image Browser and the Planetary Science Archive.

An Archive Science Review was successfully held in February resulting the need for some improvements in the data and metadata being delivered by the Rosetta instruments, some of which have been taken into account in this OSIRIS release.

The release covers the period 16 September – 19 December 2014 and includes narrow- and wide-angle camera images from Rosetta’s close observation phase when the spacecraft was just 8 km from the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, as well as pre- and post-landing imagery.

OSIRIS NAC images taken from around 30 km in September 2014. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Examples of OSIRIS NAC images taken from around 30 km in September 2014. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

They show the astonishing detail of the comet surface at close range, including images used to help characterise Philae’s landing site at Agilkia.

The image set also includes incredible views of Philae drifting across the surface of the comet on 12 November 2014 as it approached Agilkia and then bounced out of view. One example is shown below – can you spot Philae? (Hint: check against the image mosaic of Philae’s journey across the surface released after landing here).

Can you spot Philae in this image taken during the landing on 12 November 2014? Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

Can you spot Philae in this image taken during the landing on 12 November 2014? Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

The new images can be found in the folders labelled MTP007, MTP008, MTP009 and MTP010.

 

Comments

17 Comments

  • Sovereign Slave says:

    Amazing pictures, and an amazing scientific journey. My posts don’t seem to be making it past moderation (hopefully this one will), so so long. Been extremely fun and educational, and hats off to all the dedicated scientists and their many long hours of hard work to make this happen.

    • Ramcomet says:

      Thanks Sovereign Slave for being here, sharing your thoughts and provoking deeper thinking. 🙂

  • A. Cooper says:

    The Philae landing photo shows Nut (the talus-covered strip) and the smooth dusty area expanse on Serquet at bottom-left. There’s another dusty area at top-right and those two dusty areas enclose the Nut scree/talus strip. The reason they do this is because the top-right layer was once attached to the top of the Serqet smooth area (according to stretch theory- not a view held by the mainstream). It broke away and slid along the rotation plane, revealing the scree of Nut and making Nut appear to be an eroded depression. Here are the clear matches that prove that the upper-right layer was indeed attached but tore away and slid:

    https://scute1133site.wordpress.com/2016/05/04/67pchuryumov-gerasimenko-a-single-body-thats-been-stretched-part-44/

  • logan says:

    Atacama condor ‘drawn’ at 1/2x,3/4y of:

    N20140905T024555555ID30F22

    http://imagearchives.esac.esa.int/action.php?id=46414&part=e&download

    pixel 1020,1667

  • logan says:

    Lots of stereoscopic OSIRIS pairs!

    Now H. Malmer can polish his model.

  • logan says:

    OSIRIS ‘tremors’ talk of quite ‘bumpy’ rides :/

  • logan says:

    Material ejection ‘lattice’ related.

    W20141112T220019446ID30F18

    http://imagearchives.esac.esa.int/action.php?id=49981&part=e&download

    • A. Cooper says:

      logan

      Are you saying that because the lines in your linked photo are parallel and fairly evenly spaced? I think these might be dust particles near the orbiter.

      • logan says:

        Hi Cooper. Your model would require that shorter traces be -on average- more random at vectorization that larger traces. This is not the case.

  • originalJohn says:

    This looks hot
    W20141020T112042399ID3

    This looks hot and a boundary layer
    W20141020T111912050ID30

    • ianw16 says:

      @OJ,
      “This looks hot W20141020T112042399ID3”

      Nope, it looks overexposed. A quick look at the image data will confirm that. That image had an exposure time of 75s. Filter was Empty_VIS610. The images either side of it had exposure times of 18.75s, with Empty_OI and OH_Empty filters respectively.
      Hence the difference in appearance. Nothing to do with heat. Just exposure time and different filters.

  • originalJohn says:

    Notice from this how the jets tend to discharge normal to the surface on which they initiate.
    W20141127T175542441ID3

    • ianw16 says:

      @OJ,
      “Notice from this how the jets tend to discharge normal to the surface on which they initiate.
      W20141127T175542441ID3”

      Yep. And one would expect sublimation to happen how, exactly?

  • logan says:

    Tanking all participants in this Review, as well as congratulating the Rosetta Downlink and Archive group, not the less OSIRIS an ESAC Teams, as well as Emily, about the Best news!

    This photo collection, along with NAVCAM’s, NOW -for me- the most important graphic treasure on the Planetary Sciences.

    Chers to PI Dr. Holger Sierks 🙂

  • Guili says:

    Couldn’t find any of the pictures taken from 8km in the Archive Image Browser.

    • Guili says:

      Found them in the prelanding phase, sorry for the earlier post.
      Can’t download them though, will try at home.
      As for the “posted date = 12th of February 2016” stamped on each of those gorgeous pictures, what should I say ? Maybe we don’t live in the same space-time universe.

  • hannes says:

    Please… somone take all pictures and make a detailed vr-model out of them. Imagine experiencing this in virtual reality. (cardboard…)

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