CometWatch 25-27 July

Rosetta navigation camera (NAVCAM) images taken on 25, 26 and 27 July 2014. Displayed are the full-frame 1024 x 1024 pixel images with a crop from an interpolated view, processed to enhance the contrast on the nucleus. Underneath each full-frame image you can find a link to download the high resolution interpolated image (10240 x 10240 pixels).

25 July 2014

Full frame 1024 x 1024 pixel NAVCAM image taken on 25 July from a distance of about 3150 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

Full frame 1024 x 1024 pixel NAVCAM image taken on 25 July from a distance of about 3150 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

View and download interpolated image here.

Crop from the 25 July processed image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, to focus on the comet nucleus. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

Crop from the 25 July processed image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, to focus on the comet nucleus. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

26 July 2014

Full frame 1024 x 1024 pixel NAVCAM image taken on 26 July from a distance of about 2845 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

Full frame 1024 x 1024 pixel NAVCAM image taken on 26 July from a distance of about 2845 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

View and download interpolated image here.

Crop from the 26 July processed image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, to focus on the comet nucleus. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

Crop from the 26 July processed image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, to focus on the comet nucleus. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

27 July 2014

Full frame 1024 x 1024 pixel NAVCAM image taken on 27 July from a distance of about 2540 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

Full frame 1024 x 1024 pixel NAVCAM image taken on 27 July from a distance of about 2540 km from comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

View and download interpolated image here.

Crop from the 27 July processed image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, to focus on the comet nucleus. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

Crop from the 27 July processed image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, to focus on the comet nucleus. Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

Image releases are planned for every day this week at around 15:00 CEST, to showcase the NAVCAM image from the previous day.

Comments

14 Comments

  • phil says:

    YAY! getting better everyday

  • John says:

    Awesome!

  • Do the Navcam images - processed to the limit - or any recent OSIRIS images for that ,matter show any coma or jets? Or will the arrival feel like visiting an asteroid? (Already saw an astronomer misname C-G as such.)

  • Marc says:

    I have a question concerning the relative speed to the comet. After the latest FAT burn the approaching velocity was about 3.5m/s. Does this velocity stay the same afterwards until the next burn ? Or is there a change (for another reason than friction, as there should be none in space...). Reason for asking is the distances reported to the comet are not decreasing linearly. I realize Rosetta is in space following an elliptical (?) trajectory, but I am surprised about the large deviations from a linear approach... Just wondering.

    • Richard says:

      both Comet and Rosetta's trajectories are elliptical, orbiting the sun. in rendez-vous approach, the relative speed vector orientation and relative speed varies a lot. in space, it's nether as simple as pointing toward target and going forward.
      there is always change to velocity in space, it's called gravitation :)

  • Sean says:

    Fantastic! Have you selected a landing spot yet? I'd guess at where the "duck's" legs should be would be the safe place to land, but would the interesting / exciting place be 'in the saddle' behind the duck's neck?

  • Jochen Kissel says:

    Could you please indiocate the direction to the sun, so one can estimate where the shadow hides parts of the body from us or where there is no body?
    Thanks

  • Cesare Guaita Milano Plantarium says:

    More and more interesting !

  • Stephan Andersohn says:

    I'm surprised about the nucleus shape. What could be the reason for the chest? Two parts glued together or more vaporization in the middle during the last billion years? Is Rosetta able to tell the story? The last option means the origin environment in space was very inhomogeneous.

  • Joao Porto says:

    The best place to land must be where the two pieces were melted. Dont you think?

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