Where winter brings summer

Alex writes: After the sun disappeared for the last time we expected temperatures to drop below -80 degrees Celsius.  On Thursday, we woke up to find the temperature had changed overnight by 40 degrees Celsius - but instead of getting colder it had gotten warmer, reaching a 'scorching'  -28 degrees Celsius. This is warm for Concordia Station even in summer!

Temperature over 24 hours at Concordia. Credits: Concordia weather updates provided by PNRA/ ENEA

I ran outside and threw my hat into the air.  It felt like a summer's day for us who are used to living at -60 degrees Celsius or lower. Perhaps the madness has started.

We could see  that the sky had clouded over even in the Antarctic night. The clouds brought the warmth. The temperature increase came with an increase in air pressure so with each breath came more oxygen and for once less strain on bodies.

Pressure increase over 24 hours at Concordia. Credits: Concordia weather updates provided by PNRA/ ENEA

I stood outside and breathed deeply.  Despite being minus 28 degrees Celsius, it felt as near to home as I had ever been since arriving here.

Comments

9 Comments

  • Rannia Konstantopoulou says:

    Hi,
    I'm reading your posts from Athens, Greece... I'm speechless about the temperatures ! seems so 'not earthly' ? -sorry my english are very poor- and at the same time so natural !

    "Always keep Ithaca in your mind.
    To arrive there is your ultimate goal." (Constantine Cavafy)

  • Rannia Konstantopoulou says:

    I'm reading your posts from Athens, Greece... I'm speechless about the temperatures ! seems so 'not earthly' ? -sorry my english are very poor- and at the same time so natural !

    "Always keep Ithaca in your mind.
    To arrive there is your ultimate goal." (Constantine Cavafy)

  • delta T = -28 - (-45) = 17 °C in 24 hrs... such a 'sudden warming" is not so unusual during the Antarctic night. Instead, I can't figure out why the sky became cloudy while pressure was increasing. Please, could you ask a comment from Igor?

    Cheers

  • Vipin says:

    I can only imagine the exhilaration and loneliness the team must feel. Hard to imagine such a place living in NYC, but I am excited for you all!

    I hope you will experience and learn about our planet further. Will be looking out for your posts throughout the winter.

    Best,
    Vipin from NYC...

  • Julie says:

    Hi, I put your blog in my fav bar.
    What you are doing collectively is amazing.
    If I could, I think I would too, as hard as having -28 as a 'heat wave' could be.
    I have a mantra I use at work (we run a car wash open year round in Minnesota).
    One day closer to Spring.

    Disregarding the cold, Antartica is one of the most beautiful places imo.
    Things that have been frozen for thousands of years, a night sky that would make me feel like a kid in a candy store and penguins. I would be in heaven...

    I am glad I read the article on Yahoo, because what you guys are doing is just downright cool. (pun intended ^^ )

  • Ron says:

    Greetings from Minnesota in the USA! With having Spring arrive here reading your posts reminds of the upcoming winter. Although we do not see the weather extremes you must endure I can relate to the rare time when winter temperatures are unexpectantly warmer.....T-shirt and shorts weather! Keep your chins up and relish the rare opportunity that very few people will ever experience.

  • Marcus Zottl says:

    Hello down there in the (not so cold) Antarctic!

    How unusual are such high temperatures during winter if they would even be considered warm in summer?

    Best regards from Vienna.

  • Mark Faby says:

    Hey. I'm a little envious of your situation, if only for the uniqueness of it.
    I find it hard to image the cold and the dark for any period, let alone for 4 months straight.
    Good luck and keep us posted from Milwaukee, Wisc!

  • Hi everybody, hi Julien, would you mind if I profit of your blog to advertise our website? I think that some information on the meteo measurements at Concordia (and Antarctica) could be interesting for all the blog's readers!
    I see that your meteo data come from the Automatic Weather Station (AWS) installed at Concordia. The AWS at Concordia is part of the Antarctic Meteo Climatological Observatory of the Italian Antarctic Research Programme, and is supported by the French and Italian Antarctic Agencies IPEV and PNRA. Data are accessible to everybody through the web looking at http://www.climantartide.it, a website created and managed by PNRA and ENEA (the Italian National agency for new technologies, Energy and sustainable economic development). Please, visit the web site!!!
    Julien, thanks for hosting my ad....

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