Tag Archives: DOMECair

Antarctica wraps up

From Daniel Steinhage (AWI) and Steen Savstrup (DTU Space), Antarctica. On 22 January, the weather was on our side and we prepared for the last remaining flights, which we carried out in the afternoon.  It was a great feeling to have successfully finished all the flights within the time we had, with no major setbacks. We are very confident with the data we acquired and once we get back, we will start processing analysing the them. Once our scientific work was completed, and after we’d had dinner, we had to pack the aircraft and start the first leg of our return flight towards South Pole. Unfortunately, as we well know, the Antarctic...

Across Antarctica and beyond!

From Daniel Steinhage (AWI) and Steen Savstrup (DTU Space), Antarctica. Daniel and Steen update us on their challenges of flying over Antarctica to get to the Concordia station and starting the DOMECair campaign. The aim of this novel campaign is to collect measurements that will validate ESA’s Earth observation SMOS water mission and GOCE gravity mission. 13 January The overcast weather at Kohnen station finally cleared today so we were able to leave the Novo airbase, or Novo Runway as it’s commonly called, and head towards the South Pole. We had flown to Novo and met the AWI plane that we will use to take measurements for the campaign. The map below...

Scientists head to the loneliest place on Earth for ESA...

From Tȃnia (ESA-ESTEC), Noordwijk, the Netherlands Over the next few weeks we will be carefully following two intrepid scientists as they carry out an extensive airborne campaign, called DOMECair, in the far reaches of Antarctica to support two ESA missions. The reason why Steen Savstrup from the DTU National Space Institute and Daniel Steinhage from the Alfred Wegner Institute (AWI) have headed out to arguably the loneliest place on Earth is to collect measurements that will validate ESA’s SMOS and GOCE missions. Not only will the harsh environment of East Antarctica’s polar plateau where summer temperatures drop to –40°C be challenging, but also the long flights over the vast expanse of nothing...