Author Archives: emily

Rosetta’s last words: science descending to a comet

On 30 September 2016, at 11:19:37 UT in ESA’s mission control, Rosetta’s signal flat-lined, confirming that the spacecraft had completed its incredible mission on the surface of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko some 40 minutes earlier and 720 million km...

Last NAVCAM archive release

The last batch of NAVCAM images taken by Rosetta during the final month of its incredible mission at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko have been released to the Archive Image Browser. The image set covers the period 2-30 September when the spacecraft was on...

Klim Churyumov (1937-2016)

We were saddened to learn the news yesterday that Klim Churyumov, who discovered Rosetta's comet together with Svetlana Gerasimenko in 1969, has passed away. Many of us had the pleasure to meet him at various Rosetta Mission events held...

Rosetta’s Earth ‘twin’ switched off

Just as the real Rosetta spacecraft ended its mission on the comet a week ago today, so this week Rosetta's 'twin', an engineering qualification model here on Earth, was also switched off. The replica Rosetta had been...

Rosetta impact site named Sais

In case you missed it during our live coverage on Friday, Rosetta's impact site has been named Sais. Mission Manager Patrick Martin announced the name of the impact site after contact with the comet's surface was confirmed and...

Alice’s last spectra

We were happy to spot this tweet from Rosetta's Alice instrument Principal Investigator Alan Stern over the weekend, showing the final spectrograph image obtained by the instrument moments before Rosetta impacted on to the surface of the comet on Friday: Heading...

CometWatch finale: Rosetta’s last NavCam images

Rosetta's Navigation Camera captured five images shortly after the collision manoeuvre last night, which were used by flight dynamics teams to confirm the spacecraft is on track to impact its target in the Ma'at region of Comet 67P/C-G. The...

Impact site is coming in to view!

We just received this image from the OSIRIS wide-angle camera, taken at 02:17 UT at the comet. It shows the target impact region just coming in to view in the lower left –look for the distinctive shape of...

Rosetta’s last NAVCAM image

Rosetta's Navigation Camera captured five images shortly after the collision manoeuvre last night, which are being analysed by flight dynamics to confirm the spacecraft is on track to impact its target in the Ma'at region of Comet...

Impact time update: 10:38 UT

Based on the Navigation Camera images taken shortly after last night's collision manoeuvre, flight dynamics analysis has refined the predicted time of Rosetta's impact into the Ma'at region on the small lobe of Comet 67P/C-G to 10:38:32 UT+/- 2 minutes at the...

Descent images begin!

We've started to get images from Rosetta's descent. This one was taken by the OSIRIS narrow-angle camera at 01:20 UT, from a distance of around 16 km. The image scale is about 30 cm/pixel and the image...

Collision manoeuvre complete

Rosetta has completed its final manoeuvre and is now on a collision course with Comet 67P/C-G. A small thruster burn starting  20:48:11 UTC and lasting 208 seconds has set the craft on course towards its final destination....

Earlier today…!

Rosetta's OSIRIS wide-angle camera captured this image at 11:49 GMT on 29 September 2016, when the spacecraft was 22.9 km from Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.   Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA  

#LivingWithAComet blog post series – summary

Find out from Rosetta's instrument teams what it was really like "living with a comet" for two years. The blog posts include anecdotes from the teams including challenges overcome and 'scares' the instruments gave them, as well as...

Living with a comet: an OSIRIS team perspective

 OSIRIS, Rosetta’s Optical, Spectroscopic and Infrared Remote Imaging System, has been our all-seeing eye on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, capturing nearly 68,000 high-resolution images of its nucleus and coma from all angles for 924 days. Here the OSIRIS team...

Living with a comet: RPC team perspective

RPC, the Rosetta Plasma Consortium, comprises five sensors tasked with investigating the magnetic, electric and plasma environment of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimneko – the most well-known results perhaps being that of the “Singing Comet” and the non-magnetised nature of...