Tag Archives: cme

Proba SWAP 26 June Credit: ESA/Proba/Swap/SIDC

Severe geomagnetic storm – update

A short update on space weather status from Juha-Pekka Luntama, responsible for space weather activities at ESA's Space Situational Awareness programme office at ESOC, Darmstadt, Germany. As of yesterday, Earth was still within the plasma cloud of...

Proba SWAP 2015 06 24 Credit: ESA/Proba/Swap/SIDC

Severe geomagnetic storm

Update provided yesterday afternoon by Juha-Pekka Luntama, responsible for space weather activities at ESA's Space Situational Awareness programme office at ESOC, Darmstadt, Germany. We are currently in the middle of a period of high solar activity, and...

SOHO LASCO C3 coronagraph CME 10 Sep 2014 Credit: ESA/NASA

Update: Solar flare and CME 12 September

Update just sent in by ESA's Juha-Pekka Luntama, Head of the Space Weather segment in the Agency's Space Situational Awareness Programme office. The shock from the arrival of the CME (Coronal Mass Ejection) of 10 September was...

SOHO LASCO C2 coronagraph CME 10 Sep 2014 Credit: ESA/NASA
video

Solar flare 10 September 2014

Update on yesterday's solar flare and associated coronal mass ejection from Juha-Pekka Luntama, responsible for space weather at ESA's Space Situational Awareness Programme office at ESOC, darmstadt, Germany. A strong solar flare (X1.6) took place at 19:45...

Space Situational Awareness Space Weather

Large solar flare last night

A major X-class solar flare peaked in the early hours of Tuesday (25 February) morning. The X4.9 event occurred close to the solar East limb...

GOCE at 205km: Update from ESOC

This update provided by GOCE Operations Manager Christoph Steiger at ESOC. GOCE is now at an altitude of roughly 205 km, having lost about 19 km since depletion of fuel on 21 October. The atmospheric drag has increased substantially during the orbital decay, from an average of about 8 mN (milli Newton) to above 15 mN. The spacecraft behaviour is as expected, with the attitude control system continuing to work fine. We keep doing our routine spacecraft operations activities; no major problems have been encountered so far. The recent rise in solar activity has contributed to a noticeable increase in drag. Interesting days may lie ahead, as several coronal mass ejections (CMEs)...