Tag Archives: radar

It’s a wrap – airborne measurements of ice ...

From Henriette (DTU-Space), Denmark, 12 May We ended our DTU-Space part of the CryoVEx campaign on 9 May. The Norlandair Twin Otter has flown about 85 hours, covering about 20 000 km. This is about the same distance as half way around the world at the equator.  The map below shows our flight tracks. We have been able to underfly several CryoSat passes. A few of them were in formation flight with the AWI Polar-5. We have visited five main validation sites, circled in red on the map: Devon ice cap, Austfonna ice cap, the EGIG line Greenland interior, as well as sea ice north of Alert and sea ice around Svalbard...

Time to bid farewell to Alert

From Katharine (UCL), Alert, 19 April Time to leave Alert now, but here’s a quick update on the last couple of days here on the ice before we head off home. We were all very happy to have got the break in the weather we needed to land at our sites on the Arctic Ocean and we were even luckier that good weather continued to prevail at Alert. We were able to make it out onto the fast ice site on both the 17 and 18 April. The ice has lots of lump and bumps so some careful skidoo driving by Seymour made sure the radar got to the site in one...

Getting off the ground

From Katharine (UCL),  on the sea ice, 14 April   Today our pilots, Troy and Derek, gave us the all clear to fly and begin our experiment for real, setting out the corner reflectors and transect lines. So, after a last check on the weather, we loaded up the Twin Otter and were airborne by about 9.00. Due to the early start I managed to sleep all the way there and woke up when I felt the plane losing altitude. Troy and Derek were circling around the ice looking for a safe place to land, where the ice was thick enough to support our weight without us ending up in the ocean...